Antique The Liquor Traffic Must Go Pennant | Distributed by the Woman's Christian Temperance Union | Circa 1910-1919

The Liquor Traffic Must Go Pennant
2. The Liquor Traffic Must Go Pennant.jpg
3. Woman's Christian Temperance Union.jpg
4. Woman's Christian Temperance Union.jpg
5. Medium Distressed Black.jpg
6. Medium Frames.JPG
The Liquor Traffic Must Go Pennant
2. The Liquor Traffic Must Go Pennant.jpg
3. Woman's Christian Temperance Union.jpg
4. Woman's Christian Temperance Union.jpg
5. Medium Distressed Black.jpg
6. Medium Frames.JPG

Antique The Liquor Traffic Must Go Pennant | Distributed by the Woman's Christian Temperance Union | Circa 1910-1919

1,150.00

Frame Size (H x L): 14.5” x 26”
Pennant Size (H x L): 7” x 19”  

Offered is an antique pennant with an overprint stating the following: THE LIQUOR TRAFFIC MUST GO.  This rare pennant was distributed in three different colorways.  The first colorway includes a blue field, blue ties, white letters, and a white hoist strip (i.e., the pennant being offered).  The second colorway includes a white field, white ties, light blue letters, and a light blue hoist strip.  And the third colorway includes a red field, red ties, white letters, and a white hoist strip.  The Ohio Battle Flag Collection includes one of each of the first, second, and third colorways.        

The Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (“WCTU”) distributed this pennant.  The WCTU dedicated itself to numerous causes, including the broadening of women’s rights and eliminating alcohol. 

The WCTU stemmed from the 1873 Woman’s Temperance Crusade, in which women across the United States protested alcohol, stormed into saloons, sang hymns, dumped liquor barrels, and destroyed property.  Because of this, numerous saloons were forced to close, but shortly thereafter reopened.  These reopenings caused the protestors to galvanize and meet at a national convention, in Cleveland, in 1874.  Delegates from seventeen states attended the convention, founded the WCTU, and chose Annie Wittenmeyer as its president.  The WCTU was limited to women, most of whom were evangelical Protestants.    

Wittenmeyer was the president of the WCTU from 1873 until 1878, and Frances Willard was its president—and most influential and famous leader—from 1879 until 1898.  Willard lead the WCTU’s “Home Protection” campaign, in which she argued that if women could vote, then women could enact prohibition.  The WCTU developed sophisticated political organizing techniques, lobby techniques, and publishing techniques.  The WCTU had many political victories.  Most notably, the WCTU’s efforts culminated in the passage of the 18th Amendment on October 28th, 1919, which prohibited intoxicating liquors in the United States.  Specifically, it stated the following:       

Section 1. After one year from the ratification of this article the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all the territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited.

Section 2. The Congress and the several States shall have concurrent power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Section 3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.

Throughout the 1920s and 1930s, the WCTU fought efforts to repeal the 18th amendment.  But despite these efforts, in 1933, the 21st Amendment was passed, and it repealed the 18th Amendment.  It stated the following:

Section 1. The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby repealed.
Section 2. The transportation or importation into any State, Territory, or possession of the United States for delivery or use therein of intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby prohibited.
Section 3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by conventions in the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.

Following the passage of the 21st Amendment, the WCTU was considerably weaker.  Still, even today, the WCTU is an internationally active organization.  Its current efforts focus on abstaining from alcohol, drugs, and tobacco.    

Conservation Process: This pennant was hand sewn to cotton fabric, and both were hand sewn to a mounting board.  To prevent the black dye in the cotton fabric from seeping into the pennant, it was first washed in a standard wash and then in a dye setting wash.  The pennant is positioned behind a UV resistant acrylic, and spaced apart therefrom using spacers. 

Frame: This offering is in our Medium Distressed Black Frame.  However, it can be reframed and would look great using any one of our Medium Frames, which are shown in the final image.  The pricing associated with the different framing options may vary.  Reframing of an offering may delay shipment by up to two weeks.  

Condition Report: This pennant is in excellent condition.

Collectability Level: The Great – Perfect for Rising Collectors
Date of Origin: 1910-1919

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